Cultural Tourism DC Calendar

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Feb
19
Tue
2019 Regional Juried Exhibition @ Hill Center
Feb 19 all-day

The Hill Center Galleries presents its 2019 Regional Juried Exhibition. The work of more than 80 artists was chosen by juror Caitlin Berry, Fine Arts Dealer and Director at Hemphill Fine Arts in Washington, DC. The juried exhibition runs from January 10 to March 3.

HOURS

M–Th: 8am – 8pm
F: 8am – 6pm
Sa: 9am – 5pm
Su: 10am – 5 pm

A Glimpse of Ancient Yemen @ Freer Sackler
Feb 19 all-day

When caravans transported commodities to the Mediterranean world and Indian subcontinent, cities along trade routes like Timna (in today’s Yemen) became known for artistic production. Fine alabaster figures, impressive metal work, and funerary busts became hallmark’s of Yemen’s ancient cultural traditions. Long-distance trade with the Greeks, Romans, and Persians introduced artistic and cultural traditions to ancient Arabia. A Glimpse of Ancient Yemen highlights a selection of objects excavated from the region by the pioneer archaeologist Wendell Phillips and his team in 1950 and 1951. See this exhibit on display at the Freer|Sackler until August 2019.

Ambreen Butt—Mark My Words @ National Museum of Women in the Arts
Feb 19 all-day

Trained in traditional Indian and Persian miniature painting, Pakistani-American artist Ambreen Butt reimagines the genre to feature contemporary female protagonists and political subject matter. Her content tackles global issues of oppression and the role of art as social commentary. This exhibit at the National Museum of Women in the Arts explores Butt’s art through her range of techniques, including drawing, stitching, staining, etching, and gluing. This exhibit is on display though April 14, 2019.

On view December 7, 2018–April 14, 2019

Purchase your tickets to the National Museum of Women in the Arts (NMWA). Visit NMWA’s exhibitions and collection pages to see what is on view.

Admission is $10 for adults, $8 for visitors 65 and over and students, and free for NMWA members and youth 18 years and younger.

 

Between Worlds: The Art of Bill Traylor @ Smithsonian American Art Museum
Feb 19 all-day

The Smithsonian American Art Museum present the first major retrospective on an artist born into slavery with this fascinating look into the work of Bill Traylor. Born in Alabama in 1853, Traylor lived through enslavement, the Civil War, Emancipation, Reconstruction, Jim Crow laws and the Great Migration. He painted and drew striking pieces that covered a gamut of subjects, from the political to the racial to the powerful, delivering a stunning interpretation of African American life. You’ll be able to view 155 of Traylor’s most important paintings and drawings in this exhibit.

SEPTEMBER 28, 2018 – MARCH 17, 2019

Black Out: Silhouettes Then and Now @ National Portrait Gallery
Feb 19 all-day
May 11, 2018 – March 10, 2019

Silhouettes—cut paper profiles—were a hugely popular and democratic form of portraiture in the 19th century, offering virtually instantaneous likenesses of everyone from presidents to those who were enslaved. The exhibition “Black Out: Silhouettes Then and Now” explores this relatively unstudied art form by examining its rich historical roots and considering its forceful contemporary presence. The show features works from the Portrait Gallery’s extensive collection of silhouettes, such as those by Auguste Edouart, who captured the likenesses of such notable figures as John Quincy Adams and Lydia Maria Child, and at the same time, the exhibition reveals how contemporary artists are reimagining silhouettes in bold and unforgettable ways.

Celebrating New American Gardens @ US Botanic Garden
Feb 19 all-day

Public gardens across America are engaging, inviting, and dynamic. Gardens are living creations, as they display seasonal changes along with a constant ebb and flow. This exhibit celebrates American gardens created or renovated within the last five years. These gardens showcase new plant collections, create spaces for people to connect with nature, and foster sustainability. Come explore what’s new in public gardens!

First Chefs: Fame and Foodways from Britain to the Americas @ Folger Shakespeare Library
Feb 19 all-day
Jan 19 – Mar 31, 2019
Mon–Sat: 10am–5pm | Sun: noon–5pm

Just like today, getting food from farm to table in the early modern British world was hard work. And just like today, most of that hard work went unrecognized.

First Chefs tells the stories of the named and unnamed heroes of early modern food culture, and juxtaposes the extravagance of an increasingly cosmopolitan and wealthy upper class against the human cost of its pleasures: the millions of enslaved women, children, and men, servants, gardeners, street criers, and laborers who toiled to feed themselves and many others.

First Chefs

This exhibition includes five “First Chefs,” whose stories are told in the center of the hall

Flickering Treasures @ National Building Museum
Feb 19 all-day

Movie theaters are where our culture’s dreams and desires have been projected since the arrival of nickelodeons, providing an enchanting portal into a world where moviegoers could escape their everyday lives. Yet many historic theaters have not escaped the impact of social and technological change, nor the abandonment that has diminished our aging cities. Baltimore, thriving at the dawn of the cinema age, has been home to more than 240 theaters since its first Nickelodeon opened in 1905. Only a handful still function as theaters, but many survive in some form—ghosts on the gritty main streets of Charm City.

NOVEMBER 17, 2018 – OCTOBER 14, 2019

Nengajo 2019 @ Japan Information & Culture Center
Feb 19 all-day

Kick off the Year of the Boar with nengajo designs from around the world!

Explore Japanese New Year traditions with an exhibition of nearly 160 nengajo, or Japanese New Year’s cards, from the ninth annual JICC Nengajo Contest as well as other Japanese New Year’s related displays. This year’s contest drew artists from several countries, and their artistic submissions featuring the Year of the Boar will be at the JICC for the month of January. Come join us to celebrate the New Year.

The boar is the twelfth symbol in the Japanese zodiac, as the boar placed 12th in the legend of the zodiac calendar. The symbol of the boar often represents “strength” and “honesty”.

Playball @ National Museum of the U.S. Navy
Feb 19 all-day
National Museum of the U.S. Navy, Bldg.76, Washington Navy Yard, Washington, D.C. 

The National Museum of the U.S. Navy (NMUSN) to host a baseball-themed exhibition.  Playball:  Navy and the National Pastime will debut on April 2, 2018 ahead of the Washington Nationals season opener and the 2018 Major League Baseball All-Star Game at Nationals Park.  The exhibit will be on display through April 30, 2019 at the historic Washington Navy Yard at 736 Sicard Street SE, adjacent to the ballpark.  The National Museum of the U.S. Navy is free and open to the general public.

Making its debut on the east coast, Playball explores the relationship between baseball and the U.S. Navy from its earliest years through modern day.  The exhibit highlights the role of fitness in the early Navy leading to the birth of baseball in the Navy, the game during the times of war, and the inclusion of women and minorities.

All visitors must have a valid photo ID to enter the Washington Navy Yard to visit the National Museum of the United States Navy. Visitors without a DoD CAC, Uniformed ID and Privileges Card, USG-issued ID, Federal PIV Credentials, or TWIC or an escort with one of these credentials must report to the Visitor Control Center (VCC) at the primary access gate at 11th and O Streets SE (GPS address is 1022 O Street SE, Washington, DC).

The VCC is open weekdays, 6:00 a.m.-3:30 p.m.

Postmen of the Skies @ Postal Museum
Feb 19 all-day

On display until May 27, 2019

In addition to its permanent exhibition on the nation’s airmail service, the Postal Museum has a temporary exhibition, Postmen of the Skies.


Postmen of the Skies: Celebrating 100 Years of Airmail Service

In 1918 the first regularly scheduled airmail service began operations. Planes carried mail between Washington, D.C., Philadelphia and New York City. The nation greeted the new service with enthusiasm. Crowds surrounded airfields in all three cities, eager to watch history in action. The nation became more enamored with their postal pilots as the service grew. By September 8, 1920 mail was flying between New York and San Francisco.

The Post Office operated the service until 1927, having begun in 1925 to turn over some routes to private airlines. The new airlines built their businesses on the postal routes, infrastructure and pilots. Over the next decade, airmail contracts financed the fledgling airlines, serving to help build the nation’s commercial aviation industry.

Rafael Lozano-Hemmer: Pulse @ Hirshhorn Museum
Feb 19 all-day

Nov. 1 – April 28, 2019
Innovative Mexican-Canadian artist Rafael Lozano-Hemmer will bring the largest interactive technology exhibition to the Hirshhorn in the museum’s history starting Nov. 1. Pulse will take up the entire Second Level, with three major installations using heart-rate sensors to create audiovisual experiences from visitors’ biometric data. Together, the biometric signatures will create spellbinding sequences of soundscapes, lights and animations.

What Absence Is Made Of @ Hirshhorn Museum
Feb 19 all-day
This exhibit mines the Smithsonian Hirshhorn Museum’s collection to show how artists surmount the limits of the material world. Spanning more than seventy works, the exhibition explores the ways artists express absence. Tracing parallel developments in art from the 1960s to today, the exhibition draws on themes that chart the appeal of immateriality, including “The Dematerialization of the Art Object,” “The Body in Pieces,” “Close to Nothing,” “Memento,” and “The Posthuman Body.” This exhibit is on view through August.
Women Who Work, Care, And Create @ Zenith Gallery
Feb 19 all-day

Women who Work, Care, and Create
Featured Artists: Elizabeth Ashe, Jacqui Crocetta, Michelle Dickson, Elissa Farrow Savos, Susan Freda, Katharine Owens, Lynda Smith-Bugge, Paula Stern, Emily Tucci

At 1111 Pennsylvania Ave NW, Washington DC 20004
Show dates: January 14 – April 13, 2019

Meet the Artists Reception: Wednesday January 30, 5pm-8pm

Throughout history, women have been excluded in virtually every field. Even when women are included, their achievements are overlooked and forgotten. Within the male-dominated art historical field, women sculptors are a rarity — normally working in textiles, decorative and fabric art — disregarded as a lower art form. While some women sculptors working in the “high art” form such as Edmonia Lewis, Barbara Hepworth, Beverly Pepper, Properzia de’ Rossi, Ruth Asawa, and Louise Bourgeois, most of these women are not discussed enough with their male counterparts in the history of art. In the current environment we are striving to showcase our local women sculptors, their works, and their importance to the Global arts scene.

Tradition Transformed: Bojagi @ Korean Cultural Center
Feb 19 @ 9:00 am – 5:30 pm
The Korean Cultural Center Washington, D.C. proudly presents its opening exhibition of 2019, Tradition Transformed: Bojagi, featuring vibrant fiber works that capture the artistry and originality of the traditional Korean wrapping cloth, bojagi, by artists Kumjoo AhnJulia Kwon, and Wonju Seo. These three Korean American artists strive to convey deep social and emotional commentary through the integration of traditional techniques and innovative contemporary artistry in their work.
On View: January 11 – February 22, 2019 (open M-F, 9am-noon & 1:30-5:30pm)
WHERE: Korean Cultural Center Washington, D.C. (2370 Massachusetts Ave. NW)
Shane Pickett: Djinong Djina Boodja Look at the Land I Have Travelled @ Embassy of Australia
Feb 19 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm
Shane Pickett: Djinong Djina Boodja Look at the Land I Have Travelled @ Embassy of Australia | Washington | District of Columbia | United States

Date: October 10, 2018 – March 1, 2019
Location: Gallery @ Embassy of Australia 1601 Massachusetts Ave NW, Washington DC 20036. Photo ID essential for entry.

During his lifetime, Shane Pickett (1957-2010) was one of Western Australia’s most significant contemporary Aboriginal artists. Djinong Djina Boodja (Look at the Land That I Have Travelled) features works from the most radical and significant phase of his career. Pickett’s paintings resonate with a profound but subtle immediacy. Balancing innovation with tradition, modernity with an ancient spirituality, they are complex visual metaphors for the persistence of Nyoongar culture against the colonising tide of modernity. The 29 works in the exhibition present a snapshot of experiments, as Pickett explored the complex connections between the earth, creation, and spirituality that are united in the Aboriginal concept of “Dreaming.”

Djinong Djina Boodja (Look at the Land That I Have Travelled) is a touring exhibition and collaboration between the Embassy of Australia, Washington DC; the Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection of the University of Virginia; and the Mossenson Art Foundation of Perth, Australia.

Embassy gallery hours are Monday through Friday 10 am to 2pm. The exhibit runs until March 1, 2019.  ID required for entry. More here: https://usa.embassy.gov.au/events/shane-pickett-djinong-djina-boodja-look-land-i-have-travelled

Transforming Cities, Transforming Lives: The Aga Khan Historic Cities Programme
Feb 19 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

The District Architecture Center is pleased to host Transforming Cities, Transforming Lives: The Aga Khan Historic Cities Programme, an exhibition of 27 regeneration projects from nine countries that demonstrate how culture can have a positive impact well beyond conservation. These projects promote good governance, growth of civil society, rise in incomes and economic opportunities, greater respect for human rights, and better stewardship of the environment—even in the poorest and most remote areas of the globe. While some projects are completed, those that remain in progress go beyond mere technical restoration to address the questions of social and environmental context, adaptive re-use, institutional sustainability, and training.

The exhibition is presented in collaboration with the Aga Khan Council for the United States.

Gallery Hours

Mon – Wed      10:00am – 7:00pm
Thurs – Fri        10:00am – 5:00pm
Sat – Sun           Closed

Wednesday, January 9 2019 to Friday, March 29 2019

Feb
20
Wed
2019 Regional Juried Exhibition @ Hill Center
Feb 20 all-day

The Hill Center Galleries presents its 2019 Regional Juried Exhibition. The work of more than 80 artists was chosen by juror Caitlin Berry, Fine Arts Dealer and Director at Hemphill Fine Arts in Washington, DC. The juried exhibition runs from January 10 to March 3.

HOURS

M–Th: 8am – 8pm
F: 8am – 6pm
Sa: 9am – 5pm
Su: 10am – 5 pm

A Glimpse of Ancient Yemen @ Freer Sackler
Feb 20 all-day

When caravans transported commodities to the Mediterranean world and Indian subcontinent, cities along trade routes like Timna (in today’s Yemen) became known for artistic production. Fine alabaster figures, impressive metal work, and funerary busts became hallmark’s of Yemen’s ancient cultural traditions. Long-distance trade with the Greeks, Romans, and Persians introduced artistic and cultural traditions to ancient Arabia. A Glimpse of Ancient Yemen highlights a selection of objects excavated from the region by the pioneer archaeologist Wendell Phillips and his team in 1950 and 1951. See this exhibit on display at the Freer|Sackler until August 2019.

Ambreen Butt—Mark My Words @ National Museum of Women in the Arts
Feb 20 all-day

Trained in traditional Indian and Persian miniature painting, Pakistani-American artist Ambreen Butt reimagines the genre to feature contemporary female protagonists and political subject matter. Her content tackles global issues of oppression and the role of art as social commentary. This exhibit at the National Museum of Women in the Arts explores Butt’s art through her range of techniques, including drawing, stitching, staining, etching, and gluing. This exhibit is on display though April 14, 2019.

On view December 7, 2018–April 14, 2019

Purchase your tickets to the National Museum of Women in the Arts (NMWA). Visit NMWA’s exhibitions and collection pages to see what is on view.

Admission is $10 for adults, $8 for visitors 65 and over and students, and free for NMWA members and youth 18 years and younger.

 

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