Cultural Tourism DC Calendar

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Apr
25
Thu
Family Program @ U.S. Capitol Visitor Center
Apr 25 @ 10:00 am – 10:30 am

Thursdays and Saturdays at 10 a.m. and 2 p.m.

Journey to the stars as you learn how Congress has supported space exploration. Then create your own stellar keepsake. Meet behind the Statue of Freedom. 30 minutes.

 

Family Program @ U.S. Capitol Visitor Center
Apr 25 @ 2:00 pm – 2:30 pm

Thursdays and Saturdays at 10 a.m. and 2 p.m.

Journey to the stars as you learn how Congress has supported space exploration. Then create your own stellar keepsake. Meet behind the Statue of Freedom. 30 minutes.

Apr
26
Fri
Homeschool Day: Nurturing Nature in the City @ Tudor Place Historic House & Garden
Apr 26 @ 10:30 am – 1:30 pm

Jump into our garden and discover the plants, bugs and animals that live at Tudor Place. With our plentiful historic plants, array of animals and bountiful bugs, there are countless chances to spot something amazing. Join in the City Nature Challenge with a homeschool day at Tudor Place and help D.C. win the global challenge!

Choose from:

Become a nature photographer and record your observations for the City Nature Challenge. (Bring your own phone or camera)
Try your hand at botanical art just like scientists throughout history.
Be the architect of your own garden by creating the design of your dreams.
Make a bug out of recycled materials to take home.
Compare and contrast wild and cultivated plants and find out what you can do to help stop invasive species in your neighborhood.

Apr
27
Sat
Family Program @ U.S. Capitol Visitor Center
Apr 27 @ 10:00 am – 10:30 am

Thursdays and Saturdays at 10 a.m. and 2 p.m.

Journey to the stars as you learn how Congress has supported space exploration. Then create your own stellar keepsake. Meet behind the Statue of Freedom. 30 minutes.

 

Family Program @ U.S. Capitol Visitor Center
Apr 27 @ 2:00 pm – 2:30 pm

Thursdays and Saturdays at 10 a.m. and 2 p.m.

Journey to the stars as you learn how Congress has supported space exploration. Then create your own stellar keepsake. Meet behind the Statue of Freedom. 30 minutes.

Apr
30
Tue
Tudor Tot – Tuesdays, Spring Sessions @ Tudor Place Historic House & Garden
Apr 30 @ 10:00 am – 10:45 am

Join our weekly program tailored to inspire creativity and stimulate the senses. Toddler-approved activities are based on a weekly theme and include songs, stories, crafts, and movement. Parents/caregivers must remain with children at all times. Children: $5 | Adults: FREE

Spring sessions March 12, 19, 26, April 2, 16, 23, 30

Mar 12 – Shamrocks
Mar 19 – Artists
Mar 26 – Weather
Apr 2 – Goats
Apr 16 – Freedom
Apr 23 – Plants
Apr 30 – Gardeners

May
3
Fri
Coffee with a Curator: Furniture @ DAR Museum
May 3 @ 9:00 am – 10:00 am
Coffee with a Curator: Furniture @ DAR Museum

Would you like to start your morning with some coffee, pastries, and a dash of American history? Then join us the first Friday of every month for our new Coffee with a Curator series! Every month the DAR Museum curators will highlight different objects in our Study Gallery collection, providing insights, pointing out significant details, and answering questions. This unique, informal environment provides the opportunity for in-depth, intimate conversations with curators about objects within their specialty.

In order to facilitate meaningful conversation and close-looking, this program is capped at 15 attendees. Coffee, tea, and pastries provided for all program participants.

This month, join Patrick Sheary, Curator of Furnishings and Historic Interiors, in conversation about 18th and early 19th century upholstery. The discussion will focus on two items from the DAR Museum collections: the reupholstery of a Philadelphia sofa that originally belonged to Colonel Thomas Mckean (a signer of the Declaration of Independence) and an arm chair made by the Parisian furniture maker Pierre Antoine Bellange for the White House in 1817. What can these objects tell us about upholstery techniques and social status in early America?

Grab a cup and let’s start the conversation.

May
14
Tue
Tuesday Talk: Dressing Tables, Portraits, and Peg Legs @ DAR Museum
May 14 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

What do men’s wooden legs and women’s dressing tables have in common? Anglo-American residents of early American port cities amassed a variety of fine and decorative arts to assert their polite status. This talk will concentrate on the dressing furniture women used to prepare themselves for public scrutiny, the portraits artists painted of young women in courtship, and the wooden legs that men donned after the American Revolution. Together they reveal how material artifacts were vital for colonists’ transformation of themselves into polite people and for the creation of civil society in early America.

Speaker: Jennifer Van Horn, author of The Power of Objects in Eighteenth-Century British America and Assistant Professor of History and Art History at the University of Delaware

May
18
Sat
James A. Garfield and the First Decoration Day – May 30, 1868 @ Clara Barton Missing Soldiers Office Museum
May 18 @ 11:00 am – 12:00 pm

James A. Garfield and the First Decoration Day – May 30, 1868

On Saturday May 18 at the Clara Barton Missing Soldiers Office Museum, join the Site Manager of James A. Garfield National Historic Site Todd Arrington as he discusses the first Memorial Day.

The holiday we now call Memorial Day was founded after the Civil War and known initially as Decoration Day. The first national Decoration Day ceremony took place in Arlington National Cemetery on May 30, 1868. The keynote speaker that day was a young Ohio congressman and former Union general named James A. Garfield. In the shadow of the home once inhabited by Robert E. Lee, Garfield memorialized the Northern war dead but also reminded everyone what the war had truly been about, discussing slavery, freedom, civil rights, and more. This presentation will explore the origins of Decoration Day but also the themes on which future President James A. Garfield spoke on that first Decoration Day and their lasting importance.

The presentation begins at 11 AM on May 18 at the Clara Barton Missing Soldiers Office Museum. The presentation will be pay-what-you-please.

Todd Arrington is the Site Manager of James A. Garfield National Historic Site in Mentor, Ohio. As a career National Park Service historian and park ranger, he has also worked at Homestead National Monument of America in Nebraska and Gettysburg National Historic Site & Eisenhower National Historic Site, both in Pennsylvania. He is a veteran of the U.S. Army and holds a Ph.D. in history from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

Arrington has been published many times on subjects related to the American Civil War and westward expansion. His essay “Industry and Economy during the Civil War” was published in The Civil War Remembered, the National Park Service’s official handbook commemorating the 150th anniversary of the Civil War. He writes and edits for the popular history blogs We’re History and Emerging Civil War, and his book ‘The Triumphs of Liberty and Law’: The Presidential Election of 1880 will be published later this year by the University Press of Kansas. In discussing relevant history and National Park Service news and events, he has spoken at dozens of academic conferences and appeared on PBS, C-SPAN, numerous television and radio news programs, Radio Free Europe, and National Public Radio. He appeared in the PBS American Experience documentary Murder of a President about James A. Garfield in 2016.

Arrington has taught history and humanities courses at several northeast Ohio colleges, including Lake Erie College, John Carroll University, Lorain County Community College, and Lakeland Community College. He is a member of the Organization of American Historians and the Northeast Ohio Civil War Round Table.

Jun
1
Sat
Historical Tea @ DAR Museum
Jun 1 @ 12:00 pm – 2:00 pm

You’ve probably heard of Martha Washington and Abigail Adams, but there were plenty of other women who helped the United States gain independence. Meet a diverse array of historical figures through their work and records, and celebrate the women who made this country possible while you enjoy tea and pastries with your friends. All are welcome!

Included in the ticket price:

  • Finger-sandwiches and pastries
  • A tasting of teas popular in the 18th century
  • Activities related to the theme
  • Special access to objects from the museum collection
Jun
7
Fri
Coffee with a Curator: Cooking Tools @ DAR Museum
Jun 7 @ 9:00 am – 10:00 am

Would you like to start your morning with some coffee, pastries, and a dash of American history? Then join us the first Friday of every month for our new Coffee with a Curator series! Every month the DAR Museum curators will highlight different objects in our Study Gallery collection, providing insights, pointing out significant details, and answering questions. This unique, informal environment provides the opportunity for in-depth, intimate conversations with curators about objects within their specialty.

In order to facilitate meaningful conversation and close-looking, this program is capped at 15 attendees. Coffee, tea, and pastries provided for all program participants.

This month, join Carrie Blough, Assistant Registrar/Associate Curator, in conversation about 18th century cooking tools from the DAR Museum collection. How were these tools used? What can they tell us about foodways of the period?

Grab a cup and let’s start the conversation.

Jun
11
Tue
Tuesday Talk— “An Amazing Aptness for Learning Trades:” The Role of Enslaved Craftsmen in Charleston Cabinetmaking Shops @ DAR Museum
Jun 11 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

When historic furniture is put on display, most of the attention goes to the quality of the work and the master craftsman from whose shop the piece came. However, little is said about those involved in creating such a piece.  This talk will examine the role of enslaved craftsmen in Charleston cabinetmaking shops during the late eighteenth century and how wealthy Charlestonians’ desire for fashionable goods fueled the demand for this labor force.

Speaker: William Strollo, Curator of Exhibitions

Jun
13
Thu
The Wound Dresser – Walt Whitman and the Civil War @ Clara Barton Missing Soldiers Office Museum
Jun 13 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm

“Oh Captain, my Captain”–Walt Whitman’s words about President Lincoln and the Civil War continue to echo in our ears and in our pop culture. On Thursday June 13 at 6:00 PM at the Clara Barton Missing Soldiers Office, discover the man behind the poetry, as Garrett Peck introduces us to Walt Whitman the poet, the nurse, the brother, the lover, the clerk, the myth, and the man.

Garrett Peck is the author of Walt Whitman in Washington, D.C.: The Civil War and America’s Great Poet. He is a graduate of the Virginia Military Institute and earned his M.A. at the George Washington University. He leads local tours, including the Walt Whitman Tour and Alexandria’s Historic Breweries Tours.

The pay-what-you-please program begins on June 13 at 6:00 PM at the Clara Barton Missing Soldiers Office Museum.

The Wound Dresser – Walt Whitman and the Civil War @ Clara Barton Missing Soldiers Office Museum
Jun 13 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm

“Oh Captain, my Captain”–Walt Whitman’s words about President Lincoln and the Civil War continue to echo in our ears and in our pop culture. On Thursday June 13 at 6:00 PM at the Clara Barton Missing Soldiers Office, discover the man behind the poetry, as Garrett Peck introduces us to Walt Whitman the poet, the nurse, the brother, the lover, the clerk, the myth, and the man.

Garrett Peck is the author of Walt Whitman in Washington, D.C.: The Civil War and America’s Great Poet. He is a graduate of the Virginia Military Institute and earned his M.A. at the George Washington University. He leads local tours, including the Walt Whitman Tour and Alexandria’s Historic Breweries Tours.

The pay-what-you-please program begins on June 13 at 6:00 PM at the Clara Barton Missing Soldiers Office Museum.

Jul
9
Tue
Tuesday Talk— Arts and Science in 19th Century Quilts @ DAR Museum
Jul 9 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

How do 19th century quilts show their makers’ awareness of contemporary design trends and access to the latest technology of their day? Find out  how American quiltmakers were influenced by the arts and sciences from examples in the DAR Museum’s current exhibit, “A Piece of Her Mind: Culture and Technology in American Quilts.”

Speaker: Alden O’Brien, Curator of Costume and Textiles

Aug
3
Sat
World’s Fair at the DAR Museum @ DAR Museum
Aug 3 @ 10:00 am – 3:00 pm

“You must see this fair.” – Hamlin Garland, 1893

Experience the excitement, innovation, and wonder of a c.1900 World’s Fair. Learn about inventions that thrilled fairgoers and play games enjoyed by children and adults alike at these grand events. Celebrate cultures around the world by exploring the booths of local embassies and cultural centers. Fun for the whole family, this event is not one to miss!

Sep
10
Tue
Tuesday Talk— An 18th Century Cooking Challenge: Exploring Hannah Bloomfield’s Cookbook @ DAR Museum
Sep 10 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

What can Hannah Bloomfield’s handwritten recipe book from 1765 tell us about cooking and eating in the 18th century? We will explore this question while studying her life and recipes using her manuscript cookbook. Manuscript cookbooks are handwritten books containing recipes deliberately selected by the author, and carefully transcribed into a personal book. These books offer another way of understanding past lives and foodways, and also provide insight into the social and economic status of the middle and upper classes in early America.

Speaker: Carrie Blough, Associate Registrar/Assistant Curator