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Aug
24
Fri
Floating Islands Exhibition Opening: ‘The Beauty in Imperfection’ @ Japan Information & Culture Center, Embassy of Japan
Aug 24 @ 6:30 pm – 8:30 pm

Join us for a special lecture, demonstration, & performance with show curator and renowned ceramist Akira Satake, and distinguished Ikebana artist Sheila Advani to mark the opening of our new exhibition, “Floating Islands: Ceramic Ikebana Vessels.” 

To open our new, collaborative exhibition, Mr. Satake will join us for a special lecture in which he will talk about his work and experience as both a ceramic and ikebana artist, focusing on his creative philosophy and his personal vision for this exhibition. He will discuss some of his work as a composer, and will perform a mini concert with shamisen and banjo. Distinguished Ikebana artist Sheila Advani, who holds the advanced master degree of komon from the Sogetsu School of Ikebana, will also join us for this lecture to discuss the history and schools of ikebana, and her own views regarding the relation of an Ikebana arrangement to its ceramic vessel. Following her lecture, Ms. Advani will hold a live demonstration of an ikebana arrangement.

About the Presenters

Akira Satake was born Osaka, Japan and has lived in the U.S. since 1983. He has taught master classes and workshops across the country , and has also lectured and taught workshops abroad in Australia, Belgium, England, France, and Israel. He received the National Award for Excellence in Contemporary Craft by the Philadelphia Museum, and “A Craftsman’s Legacy,” – a national television series on PBS, featured his life and work. Satake currently lives in Asheville, North Carolina, where he recently opened a new gallery space. He is also an accomplished banjo player and composer.

Sheila Advani was the past president of Ikebana International, Washington D.C., Chapter No.1 twice., from 1989 to 1991 and again from 1999 to 2001. She holds the advanced master degree of kimono from the Sogetsu School of Ikebana, and she currently teaches Sogetsu in Harrisburg, PA. She began her studies n 1978 and has worked under the mentorship of Ruth Yochelson, Mary Sugiyama, and Chieko Mihori. Sheila has held exhibitions, demonstrations, and workshops both locally in the Washington, D.C. area and internationally. More recently, she exhibited in Japan during the Ikebana International World Convention.

This event is free and open to the public, but registration is required for security purposes. Program begins at 6:30 PM. Doors open 30 minutes prior. No admittance after 7:00 PM or once seating is full. Registered guests will be seated on a first come, first served basis. Please note that seating is limited and registration does not guarantee guests a seat. To modify your registration, please email jicc@ws.mofa.go.jp. Your registration is not transferable. 
Aug
27
Mon
Floating Islands: Ceramic Ikebana Vessels – Exhibition @ Japan Information & Culture Center, Embassy of Japan
Aug 27 @ 9:00 am – 5:00 pm

Explore how a beloved Japanese tradition is being reinterpreted and inherited in the United States at the JICC’s “Floating Islands: Ceramic Ikebana Vessels” exhibition, presented together with the District Clay Center and Ikebana International, Washington, D.C., Chapter No.1, and sponsored by Marymount University.

Each artist succeeds in bringing out the beauty they find in the clay and creating something organically expressive, timeless, and yet totally of the moment.  – Akira Satake, Curator

Curated by renowned ceramist Akira Satake, this exhibition features ceramic ikebana vessels created by some of the most talented potters working within the U.S. today, several of which have lived and studied in pottery towns in Japan such as Bizen, Mashiko, and Shigaraki, where they were all to hone their art and bring back methods of making and firing to the United States. All featured potters, including special guest artist, Japanese Master Potter Ken Matsuzaki, share an innate sense of the importance of ma, or “negative space,” a concept integral to Japanese aesthetics. Exhibition panels will allow visitors to gain insight into the various traditional techniques of ceramics native to Japan, as well as the principles standard to the schools of Ikebana. Artist statements on display will also invite viewers to explore the unique ways each ceramic artist took inspiration from traditional Japanese aesthetics and evolved it to a personal style. Additionally, three Ikebana artists from Ikebana International, Washington D.C., Chapter No.1 will exhibit arrangements inspired by and featuring three of the exhibited vessels.

About the Title: “Floating Islands: Ceramic Ikebana Vessels” – Each ikebana arrangement is an island – a complete and perfect world unto itself that is floating on its ceramic vessel. This idea comes from Ikebana’s objective to distill the outside world, particularly the natural landscape, down to a simple, but perfectly balanced piece of part that can be contemplated indoors. The title is also reminiscent of the “floating world” of ukiyo-e.

This exhibit will move to the District Clay Gallery on September 29th and will be on display at the District Clay Gallery from September 29th to October 31st. 

Exhibiting Artists, Ceramics: Birdie Boone, Erica Iman, Ani Kasten, Sangjoon Park, Jeff Shapiro, Peter Callas, Jan McKeachie-Johnston, Simon Levin, Tim Rowan, Catherine White, Michael Hunt & Naomi Dalglish, Randon Johnston, Ken Matsuzaki, Akira Satake

Exhibiting Artists, Ikebana: Helena Arouca, Ikebana Sangetsu; Bruce Wilson, Saga Goryu Ikebana; Jane Redmon, Sogetsu Ikebana

This exhibition is free and open to the public. The exhibition will run from August 27th through September 27th at the JICC and will be open to the public during regular JICC hours, 9 AM to 5 PM, Monday through Friday. The JICC will be closed on September 3rd in observance of Labor Day. 
Aug
28
Tue
Floating Islands: Ceramic Ikebana Vessels – Exhibition @ Japan Information & Culture Center, Embassy of Japan
Aug 28 @ 9:00 am – 5:00 pm

Explore how a beloved Japanese tradition is being reinterpreted and inherited in the United States at the JICC’s “Floating Islands: Ceramic Ikebana Vessels” exhibition, presented together with the District Clay Center and Ikebana International, Washington, D.C., Chapter No.1, and sponsored by Marymount University.

Each artist succeeds in bringing out the beauty they find in the clay and creating something organically expressive, timeless, and yet totally of the moment.  – Akira Satake, Curator

Curated by renowned ceramist Akira Satake, this exhibition features ceramic ikebana vessels created by some of the most talented potters working within the U.S. today, several of which have lived and studied in pottery towns in Japan such as Bizen, Mashiko, and Shigaraki, where they were all to hone their art and bring back methods of making and firing to the United States. All featured potters, including special guest artist, Japanese Master Potter Ken Matsuzaki, share an innate sense of the importance of ma, or “negative space,” a concept integral to Japanese aesthetics. Exhibition panels will allow visitors to gain insight into the various traditional techniques of ceramics native to Japan, as well as the principles standard to the schools of Ikebana. Artist statements on display will also invite viewers to explore the unique ways each ceramic artist took inspiration from traditional Japanese aesthetics and evolved it to a personal style. Additionally, three Ikebana artists from Ikebana International, Washington D.C., Chapter No.1 will exhibit arrangements inspired by and featuring three of the exhibited vessels.

About the Title: “Floating Islands: Ceramic Ikebana Vessels” – Each ikebana arrangement is an island – a complete and perfect world unto itself that is floating on its ceramic vessel. This idea comes from Ikebana’s objective to distill the outside world, particularly the natural landscape, down to a simple, but perfectly balanced piece of part that can be contemplated indoors. The title is also reminiscent of the “floating world” of ukiyo-e.

This exhibit will move to the District Clay Gallery on September 29th and will be on display at the District Clay Gallery from September 29th to October 31st. 

Exhibiting Artists, Ceramics: Birdie Boone, Erica Iman, Ani Kasten, Sangjoon Park, Jeff Shapiro, Peter Callas, Jan McKeachie-Johnston, Simon Levin, Tim Rowan, Catherine White, Michael Hunt & Naomi Dalglish, Randon Johnston, Ken Matsuzaki, Akira Satake

Exhibiting Artists, Ikebana: Helena Arouca, Ikebana Sangetsu; Bruce Wilson, Saga Goryu Ikebana; Jane Redmon, Sogetsu Ikebana

This exhibition is free and open to the public. The exhibition will run from August 27th through September 27th at the JICC and will be open to the public during regular JICC hours, 9 AM to 5 PM, Monday through Friday. The JICC will be closed on September 3rd in observance of Labor Day. 
Aug
29
Wed
Floating Islands: Ceramic Ikebana Vessels – Exhibition @ Japan Information & Culture Center, Embassy of Japan
Aug 29 @ 9:00 am – 5:00 pm

Explore how a beloved Japanese tradition is being reinterpreted and inherited in the United States at the JICC’s “Floating Islands: Ceramic Ikebana Vessels” exhibition, presented together with the District Clay Center and Ikebana International, Washington, D.C., Chapter No.1, and sponsored by Marymount University.

Each artist succeeds in bringing out the beauty they find in the clay and creating something organically expressive, timeless, and yet totally of the moment.  – Akira Satake, Curator

Curated by renowned ceramist Akira Satake, this exhibition features ceramic ikebana vessels created by some of the most talented potters working within the U.S. today, several of which have lived and studied in pottery towns in Japan such as Bizen, Mashiko, and Shigaraki, where they were all to hone their art and bring back methods of making and firing to the United States. All featured potters, including special guest artist, Japanese Master Potter Ken Matsuzaki, share an innate sense of the importance of ma, or “negative space,” a concept integral to Japanese aesthetics. Exhibition panels will allow visitors to gain insight into the various traditional techniques of ceramics native to Japan, as well as the principles standard to the schools of Ikebana. Artist statements on display will also invite viewers to explore the unique ways each ceramic artist took inspiration from traditional Japanese aesthetics and evolved it to a personal style. Additionally, three Ikebana artists from Ikebana International, Washington D.C., Chapter No.1 will exhibit arrangements inspired by and featuring three of the exhibited vessels.

About the Title: “Floating Islands: Ceramic Ikebana Vessels” – Each ikebana arrangement is an island – a complete and perfect world unto itself that is floating on its ceramic vessel. This idea comes from Ikebana’s objective to distill the outside world, particularly the natural landscape, down to a simple, but perfectly balanced piece of part that can be contemplated indoors. The title is also reminiscent of the “floating world” of ukiyo-e.

This exhibit will move to the District Clay Gallery on September 29th and will be on display at the District Clay Gallery from September 29th to October 31st. 

Exhibiting Artists, Ceramics: Birdie Boone, Erica Iman, Ani Kasten, Sangjoon Park, Jeff Shapiro, Peter Callas, Jan McKeachie-Johnston, Simon Levin, Tim Rowan, Catherine White, Michael Hunt & Naomi Dalglish, Randon Johnston, Ken Matsuzaki, Akira Satake

Exhibiting Artists, Ikebana: Helena Arouca, Ikebana Sangetsu; Bruce Wilson, Saga Goryu Ikebana; Jane Redmon, Sogetsu Ikebana

This exhibition is free and open to the public. The exhibition will run from August 27th through September 27th at the JICC and will be open to the public during regular JICC hours, 9 AM to 5 PM, Monday through Friday. The JICC will be closed on September 3rd in observance of Labor Day. 
Aug
30
Thu
Floating Islands: Ceramic Ikebana Vessels – Exhibition @ Japan Information & Culture Center, Embassy of Japan
Aug 30 @ 9:00 am – 5:00 pm

Explore how a beloved Japanese tradition is being reinterpreted and inherited in the United States at the JICC’s “Floating Islands: Ceramic Ikebana Vessels” exhibition, presented together with the District Clay Center and Ikebana International, Washington, D.C., Chapter No.1, and sponsored by Marymount University.

Each artist succeeds in bringing out the beauty they find in the clay and creating something organically expressive, timeless, and yet totally of the moment.  – Akira Satake, Curator

Curated by renowned ceramist Akira Satake, this exhibition features ceramic ikebana vessels created by some of the most talented potters working within the U.S. today, several of which have lived and studied in pottery towns in Japan such as Bizen, Mashiko, and Shigaraki, where they were all to hone their art and bring back methods of making and firing to the United States. All featured potters, including special guest artist, Japanese Master Potter Ken Matsuzaki, share an innate sense of the importance of ma, or “negative space,” a concept integral to Japanese aesthetics. Exhibition panels will allow visitors to gain insight into the various traditional techniques of ceramics native to Japan, as well as the principles standard to the schools of Ikebana. Artist statements on display will also invite viewers to explore the unique ways each ceramic artist took inspiration from traditional Japanese aesthetics and evolved it to a personal style. Additionally, three Ikebana artists from Ikebana International, Washington D.C., Chapter No.1 will exhibit arrangements inspired by and featuring three of the exhibited vessels.

About the Title: “Floating Islands: Ceramic Ikebana Vessels” – Each ikebana arrangement is an island – a complete and perfect world unto itself that is floating on its ceramic vessel. This idea comes from Ikebana’s objective to distill the outside world, particularly the natural landscape, down to a simple, but perfectly balanced piece of part that can be contemplated indoors. The title is also reminiscent of the “floating world” of ukiyo-e.

This exhibit will move to the District Clay Gallery on September 29th and will be on display at the District Clay Gallery from September 29th to October 31st. 

Exhibiting Artists, Ceramics: Birdie Boone, Erica Iman, Ani Kasten, Sangjoon Park, Jeff Shapiro, Peter Callas, Jan McKeachie-Johnston, Simon Levin, Tim Rowan, Catherine White, Michael Hunt & Naomi Dalglish, Randon Johnston, Ken Matsuzaki, Akira Satake

Exhibiting Artists, Ikebana: Helena Arouca, Ikebana Sangetsu; Bruce Wilson, Saga Goryu Ikebana; Jane Redmon, Sogetsu Ikebana

This exhibition is free and open to the public. The exhibition will run from August 27th through September 27th at the JICC and will be open to the public during regular JICC hours, 9 AM to 5 PM, Monday through Friday. The JICC will be closed on September 3rd in observance of Labor Day. 
Aug
31
Fri
Floating Islands: Ceramic Ikebana Vessels – Exhibition @ Japan Information & Culture Center, Embassy of Japan
Aug 31 @ 9:00 am – 5:00 pm

Explore how a beloved Japanese tradition is being reinterpreted and inherited in the United States at the JICC’s “Floating Islands: Ceramic Ikebana Vessels” exhibition, presented together with the District Clay Center and Ikebana International, Washington, D.C., Chapter No.1, and sponsored by Marymount University.

Each artist succeeds in bringing out the beauty they find in the clay and creating something organically expressive, timeless, and yet totally of the moment.  – Akira Satake, Curator

Curated by renowned ceramist Akira Satake, this exhibition features ceramic ikebana vessels created by some of the most talented potters working within the U.S. today, several of which have lived and studied in pottery towns in Japan such as Bizen, Mashiko, and Shigaraki, where they were all to hone their art and bring back methods of making and firing to the United States. All featured potters, including special guest artist, Japanese Master Potter Ken Matsuzaki, share an innate sense of the importance of ma, or “negative space,” a concept integral to Japanese aesthetics. Exhibition panels will allow visitors to gain insight into the various traditional techniques of ceramics native to Japan, as well as the principles standard to the schools of Ikebana. Artist statements on display will also invite viewers to explore the unique ways each ceramic artist took inspiration from traditional Japanese aesthetics and evolved it to a personal style. Additionally, three Ikebana artists from Ikebana International, Washington D.C., Chapter No.1 will exhibit arrangements inspired by and featuring three of the exhibited vessels.

About the Title: “Floating Islands: Ceramic Ikebana Vessels” – Each ikebana arrangement is an island – a complete and perfect world unto itself that is floating on its ceramic vessel. This idea comes from Ikebana’s objective to distill the outside world, particularly the natural landscape, down to a simple, but perfectly balanced piece of part that can be contemplated indoors. The title is also reminiscent of the “floating world” of ukiyo-e.

This exhibit will move to the District Clay Gallery on September 29th and will be on display at the District Clay Gallery from September 29th to October 31st. 

Exhibiting Artists, Ceramics: Birdie Boone, Erica Iman, Ani Kasten, Sangjoon Park, Jeff Shapiro, Peter Callas, Jan McKeachie-Johnston, Simon Levin, Tim Rowan, Catherine White, Michael Hunt & Naomi Dalglish, Randon Johnston, Ken Matsuzaki, Akira Satake

Exhibiting Artists, Ikebana: Helena Arouca, Ikebana Sangetsu; Bruce Wilson, Saga Goryu Ikebana; Jane Redmon, Sogetsu Ikebana

This exhibition is free and open to the public. The exhibition will run from August 27th through September 27th at the JICC and will be open to the public during regular JICC hours, 9 AM to 5 PM, Monday through Friday. The JICC will be closed on September 3rd in observance of Labor Day. 
Sep
3
Mon
Floating Islands: Ceramic Ikebana Vessels – Exhibition @ Japan Information & Culture Center, Embassy of Japan
Sep 3 @ 9:00 am – 5:00 pm

Explore how a beloved Japanese tradition is being reinterpreted and inherited in the United States at the JICC’s “Floating Islands: Ceramic Ikebana Vessels” exhibition, presented together with the District Clay Center and Ikebana International, Washington, D.C., Chapter No.1, and sponsored by Marymount University.

Each artist succeeds in bringing out the beauty they find in the clay and creating something organically expressive, timeless, and yet totally of the moment.  – Akira Satake, Curator

Curated by renowned ceramist Akira Satake, this exhibition features ceramic ikebana vessels created by some of the most talented potters working within the U.S. today, several of which have lived and studied in pottery towns in Japan such as Bizen, Mashiko, and Shigaraki, where they were all to hone their art and bring back methods of making and firing to the United States. All featured potters, including special guest artist, Japanese Master Potter Ken Matsuzaki, share an innate sense of the importance of ma, or “negative space,” a concept integral to Japanese aesthetics. Exhibition panels will allow visitors to gain insight into the various traditional techniques of ceramics native to Japan, as well as the principles standard to the schools of Ikebana. Artist statements on display will also invite viewers to explore the unique ways each ceramic artist took inspiration from traditional Japanese aesthetics and evolved it to a personal style. Additionally, three Ikebana artists from Ikebana International, Washington D.C., Chapter No.1 will exhibit arrangements inspired by and featuring three of the exhibited vessels.

About the Title: “Floating Islands: Ceramic Ikebana Vessels” – Each ikebana arrangement is an island – a complete and perfect world unto itself that is floating on its ceramic vessel. This idea comes from Ikebana’s objective to distill the outside world, particularly the natural landscape, down to a simple, but perfectly balanced piece of part that can be contemplated indoors. The title is also reminiscent of the “floating world” of ukiyo-e.

This exhibit will move to the District Clay Gallery on September 29th and will be on display at the District Clay Gallery from September 29th to October 31st. 

Exhibiting Artists, Ceramics: Birdie Boone, Erica Iman, Ani Kasten, Sangjoon Park, Jeff Shapiro, Peter Callas, Jan McKeachie-Johnston, Simon Levin, Tim Rowan, Catherine White, Michael Hunt & Naomi Dalglish, Randon Johnston, Ken Matsuzaki, Akira Satake

Exhibiting Artists, Ikebana: Helena Arouca, Ikebana Sangetsu; Bruce Wilson, Saga Goryu Ikebana; Jane Redmon, Sogetsu Ikebana

This exhibition is free and open to the public. The exhibition will run from August 27th through September 27th at the JICC and will be open to the public during regular JICC hours, 9 AM to 5 PM, Monday through Friday. The JICC will be closed on September 3rd in observance of Labor Day. 
Sep
4
Tue
Floating Islands: Ceramic Ikebana Vessels – Exhibition @ Japan Information & Culture Center, Embassy of Japan
Sep 4 @ 9:00 am – 5:00 pm

Explore how a beloved Japanese tradition is being reinterpreted and inherited in the United States at the JICC’s “Floating Islands: Ceramic Ikebana Vessels” exhibition, presented together with the District Clay Center and Ikebana International, Washington, D.C., Chapter No.1, and sponsored by Marymount University.

Each artist succeeds in bringing out the beauty they find in the clay and creating something organically expressive, timeless, and yet totally of the moment.  – Akira Satake, Curator

Curated by renowned ceramist Akira Satake, this exhibition features ceramic ikebana vessels created by some of the most talented potters working within the U.S. today, several of which have lived and studied in pottery towns in Japan such as Bizen, Mashiko, and Shigaraki, where they were all to hone their art and bring back methods of making and firing to the United States. All featured potters, including special guest artist, Japanese Master Potter Ken Matsuzaki, share an innate sense of the importance of ma, or “negative space,” a concept integral to Japanese aesthetics. Exhibition panels will allow visitors to gain insight into the various traditional techniques of ceramics native to Japan, as well as the principles standard to the schools of Ikebana. Artist statements on display will also invite viewers to explore the unique ways each ceramic artist took inspiration from traditional Japanese aesthetics and evolved it to a personal style. Additionally, three Ikebana artists from Ikebana International, Washington D.C., Chapter No.1 will exhibit arrangements inspired by and featuring three of the exhibited vessels.

About the Title: “Floating Islands: Ceramic Ikebana Vessels” – Each ikebana arrangement is an island – a complete and perfect world unto itself that is floating on its ceramic vessel. This idea comes from Ikebana’s objective to distill the outside world, particularly the natural landscape, down to a simple, but perfectly balanced piece of part that can be contemplated indoors. The title is also reminiscent of the “floating world” of ukiyo-e.

This exhibit will move to the District Clay Gallery on September 29th and will be on display at the District Clay Gallery from September 29th to October 31st. 

Exhibiting Artists, Ceramics: Birdie Boone, Erica Iman, Ani Kasten, Sangjoon Park, Jeff Shapiro, Peter Callas, Jan McKeachie-Johnston, Simon Levin, Tim Rowan, Catherine White, Michael Hunt & Naomi Dalglish, Randon Johnston, Ken Matsuzaki, Akira Satake

Exhibiting Artists, Ikebana: Helena Arouca, Ikebana Sangetsu; Bruce Wilson, Saga Goryu Ikebana; Jane Redmon, Sogetsu Ikebana

This exhibition is free and open to the public. The exhibition will run from August 27th through September 27th at the JICC and will be open to the public during regular JICC hours, 9 AM to 5 PM, Monday through Friday. The JICC will be closed on September 3rd in observance of Labor Day. 
Sep
5
Wed
Floating Islands: Ceramic Ikebana Vessels – Exhibition @ Japan Information & Culture Center, Embassy of Japan
Sep 5 @ 9:00 am – 5:00 pm

Explore how a beloved Japanese tradition is being reinterpreted and inherited in the United States at the JICC’s “Floating Islands: Ceramic Ikebana Vessels” exhibition, presented together with the District Clay Center and Ikebana International, Washington, D.C., Chapter No.1, and sponsored by Marymount University.

Each artist succeeds in bringing out the beauty they find in the clay and creating something organically expressive, timeless, and yet totally of the moment.  – Akira Satake, Curator

Curated by renowned ceramist Akira Satake, this exhibition features ceramic ikebana vessels created by some of the most talented potters working within the U.S. today, several of which have lived and studied in pottery towns in Japan such as Bizen, Mashiko, and Shigaraki, where they were all to hone their art and bring back methods of making and firing to the United States. All featured potters, including special guest artist, Japanese Master Potter Ken Matsuzaki, share an innate sense of the importance of ma, or “negative space,” a concept integral to Japanese aesthetics. Exhibition panels will allow visitors to gain insight into the various traditional techniques of ceramics native to Japan, as well as the principles standard to the schools of Ikebana. Artist statements on display will also invite viewers to explore the unique ways each ceramic artist took inspiration from traditional Japanese aesthetics and evolved it to a personal style. Additionally, three Ikebana artists from Ikebana International, Washington D.C., Chapter No.1 will exhibit arrangements inspired by and featuring three of the exhibited vessels.

About the Title: “Floating Islands: Ceramic Ikebana Vessels” – Each ikebana arrangement is an island – a complete and perfect world unto itself that is floating on its ceramic vessel. This idea comes from Ikebana’s objective to distill the outside world, particularly the natural landscape, down to a simple, but perfectly balanced piece of part that can be contemplated indoors. The title is also reminiscent of the “floating world” of ukiyo-e.

This exhibit will move to the District Clay Gallery on September 29th and will be on display at the District Clay Gallery from September 29th to October 31st. 

Exhibiting Artists, Ceramics: Birdie Boone, Erica Iman, Ani Kasten, Sangjoon Park, Jeff Shapiro, Peter Callas, Jan McKeachie-Johnston, Simon Levin, Tim Rowan, Catherine White, Michael Hunt & Naomi Dalglish, Randon Johnston, Ken Matsuzaki, Akira Satake

Exhibiting Artists, Ikebana: Helena Arouca, Ikebana Sangetsu; Bruce Wilson, Saga Goryu Ikebana; Jane Redmon, Sogetsu Ikebana

This exhibition is free and open to the public. The exhibition will run from August 27th through September 27th at the JICC and will be open to the public during regular JICC hours, 9 AM to 5 PM, Monday through Friday. The JICC will be closed on September 3rd in observance of Labor Day. 
Sep
6
Thu
Floating Islands: Ceramic Ikebana Vessels – Exhibition @ Japan Information & Culture Center, Embassy of Japan
Sep 6 @ 9:00 am – 5:00 pm

Explore how a beloved Japanese tradition is being reinterpreted and inherited in the United States at the JICC’s “Floating Islands: Ceramic Ikebana Vessels” exhibition, presented together with the District Clay Center and Ikebana International, Washington, D.C., Chapter No.1, and sponsored by Marymount University.

Each artist succeeds in bringing out the beauty they find in the clay and creating something organically expressive, timeless, and yet totally of the moment.  – Akira Satake, Curator

Curated by renowned ceramist Akira Satake, this exhibition features ceramic ikebana vessels created by some of the most talented potters working within the U.S. today, several of which have lived and studied in pottery towns in Japan such as Bizen, Mashiko, and Shigaraki, where they were all to hone their art and bring back methods of making and firing to the United States. All featured potters, including special guest artist, Japanese Master Potter Ken Matsuzaki, share an innate sense of the importance of ma, or “negative space,” a concept integral to Japanese aesthetics. Exhibition panels will allow visitors to gain insight into the various traditional techniques of ceramics native to Japan, as well as the principles standard to the schools of Ikebana. Artist statements on display will also invite viewers to explore the unique ways each ceramic artist took inspiration from traditional Japanese aesthetics and evolved it to a personal style. Additionally, three Ikebana artists from Ikebana International, Washington D.C., Chapter No.1 will exhibit arrangements inspired by and featuring three of the exhibited vessels.

About the Title: “Floating Islands: Ceramic Ikebana Vessels” – Each ikebana arrangement is an island – a complete and perfect world unto itself that is floating on its ceramic vessel. This idea comes from Ikebana’s objective to distill the outside world, particularly the natural landscape, down to a simple, but perfectly balanced piece of part that can be contemplated indoors. The title is also reminiscent of the “floating world” of ukiyo-e.

This exhibit will move to the District Clay Gallery on September 29th and will be on display at the District Clay Gallery from September 29th to October 31st. 

Exhibiting Artists, Ceramics: Birdie Boone, Erica Iman, Ani Kasten, Sangjoon Park, Jeff Shapiro, Peter Callas, Jan McKeachie-Johnston, Simon Levin, Tim Rowan, Catherine White, Michael Hunt & Naomi Dalglish, Randon Johnston, Ken Matsuzaki, Akira Satake

Exhibiting Artists, Ikebana: Helena Arouca, Ikebana Sangetsu; Bruce Wilson, Saga Goryu Ikebana; Jane Redmon, Sogetsu Ikebana

This exhibition is free and open to the public. The exhibition will run from August 27th through September 27th at the JICC and will be open to the public during regular JICC hours, 9 AM to 5 PM, Monday through Friday. The JICC will be closed on September 3rd in observance of Labor Day. 
Sep
7
Fri
Floating Islands: Ceramic Ikebana Vessels – Exhibition @ Japan Information & Culture Center, Embassy of Japan
Sep 7 @ 9:00 am – 5:00 pm

Explore how a beloved Japanese tradition is being reinterpreted and inherited in the United States at the JICC’s “Floating Islands: Ceramic Ikebana Vessels” exhibition, presented together with the District Clay Center and Ikebana International, Washington, D.C., Chapter No.1, and sponsored by Marymount University.

Each artist succeeds in bringing out the beauty they find in the clay and creating something organically expressive, timeless, and yet totally of the moment.  – Akira Satake, Curator

Curated by renowned ceramist Akira Satake, this exhibition features ceramic ikebana vessels created by some of the most talented potters working within the U.S. today, several of which have lived and studied in pottery towns in Japan such as Bizen, Mashiko, and Shigaraki, where they were all to hone their art and bring back methods of making and firing to the United States. All featured potters, including special guest artist, Japanese Master Potter Ken Matsuzaki, share an innate sense of the importance of ma, or “negative space,” a concept integral to Japanese aesthetics. Exhibition panels will allow visitors to gain insight into the various traditional techniques of ceramics native to Japan, as well as the principles standard to the schools of Ikebana. Artist statements on display will also invite viewers to explore the unique ways each ceramic artist took inspiration from traditional Japanese aesthetics and evolved it to a personal style. Additionally, three Ikebana artists from Ikebana International, Washington D.C., Chapter No.1 will exhibit arrangements inspired by and featuring three of the exhibited vessels.

About the Title: “Floating Islands: Ceramic Ikebana Vessels” – Each ikebana arrangement is an island – a complete and perfect world unto itself that is floating on its ceramic vessel. This idea comes from Ikebana’s objective to distill the outside world, particularly the natural landscape, down to a simple, but perfectly balanced piece of part that can be contemplated indoors. The title is also reminiscent of the “floating world” of ukiyo-e.

This exhibit will move to the District Clay Gallery on September 29th and will be on display at the District Clay Gallery from September 29th to October 31st. 

Exhibiting Artists, Ceramics: Birdie Boone, Erica Iman, Ani Kasten, Sangjoon Park, Jeff Shapiro, Peter Callas, Jan McKeachie-Johnston, Simon Levin, Tim Rowan, Catherine White, Michael Hunt & Naomi Dalglish, Randon Johnston, Ken Matsuzaki, Akira Satake

Exhibiting Artists, Ikebana: Helena Arouca, Ikebana Sangetsu; Bruce Wilson, Saga Goryu Ikebana; Jane Redmon, Sogetsu Ikebana

This exhibition is free and open to the public. The exhibition will run from August 27th through September 27th at the JICC and will be open to the public during regular JICC hours, 9 AM to 5 PM, Monday through Friday. The JICC will be closed on September 3rd in observance of Labor Day. 
Sep
10
Mon
Floating Islands: Ceramic Ikebana Vessels – Exhibition @ Japan Information & Culture Center, Embassy of Japan
Sep 10 @ 9:00 am – 5:00 pm

Explore how a beloved Japanese tradition is being reinterpreted and inherited in the United States at the JICC’s “Floating Islands: Ceramic Ikebana Vessels” exhibition, presented together with the District Clay Center and Ikebana International, Washington, D.C., Chapter No.1, and sponsored by Marymount University.

Each artist succeeds in bringing out the beauty they find in the clay and creating something organically expressive, timeless, and yet totally of the moment.  – Akira Satake, Curator

Curated by renowned ceramist Akira Satake, this exhibition features ceramic ikebana vessels created by some of the most talented potters working within the U.S. today, several of which have lived and studied in pottery towns in Japan such as Bizen, Mashiko, and Shigaraki, where they were all to hone their art and bring back methods of making and firing to the United States. All featured potters, including special guest artist, Japanese Master Potter Ken Matsuzaki, share an innate sense of the importance of ma, or “negative space,” a concept integral to Japanese aesthetics. Exhibition panels will allow visitors to gain insight into the various traditional techniques of ceramics native to Japan, as well as the principles standard to the schools of Ikebana. Artist statements on display will also invite viewers to explore the unique ways each ceramic artist took inspiration from traditional Japanese aesthetics and evolved it to a personal style. Additionally, three Ikebana artists from Ikebana International, Washington D.C., Chapter No.1 will exhibit arrangements inspired by and featuring three of the exhibited vessels.

About the Title: “Floating Islands: Ceramic Ikebana Vessels” – Each ikebana arrangement is an island – a complete and perfect world unto itself that is floating on its ceramic vessel. This idea comes from Ikebana’s objective to distill the outside world, particularly the natural landscape, down to a simple, but perfectly balanced piece of part that can be contemplated indoors. The title is also reminiscent of the “floating world” of ukiyo-e.

This exhibit will move to the District Clay Gallery on September 29th and will be on display at the District Clay Gallery from September 29th to October 31st. 

Exhibiting Artists, Ceramics: Birdie Boone, Erica Iman, Ani Kasten, Sangjoon Park, Jeff Shapiro, Peter Callas, Jan McKeachie-Johnston, Simon Levin, Tim Rowan, Catherine White, Michael Hunt & Naomi Dalglish, Randon Johnston, Ken Matsuzaki, Akira Satake

Exhibiting Artists, Ikebana: Helena Arouca, Ikebana Sangetsu; Bruce Wilson, Saga Goryu Ikebana; Jane Redmon, Sogetsu Ikebana

This exhibition is free and open to the public. The exhibition will run from August 27th through September 27th at the JICC and will be open to the public during regular JICC hours, 9 AM to 5 PM, Monday through Friday. The JICC will be closed on September 3rd in observance of Labor Day. 
Sep
11
Tue
Floating Islands: Ceramic Ikebana Vessels – Exhibition @ Japan Information & Culture Center, Embassy of Japan
Sep 11 @ 9:00 am – 5:00 pm

Explore how a beloved Japanese tradition is being reinterpreted and inherited in the United States at the JICC’s “Floating Islands: Ceramic Ikebana Vessels” exhibition, presented together with the District Clay Center and Ikebana International, Washington, D.C., Chapter No.1, and sponsored by Marymount University.

Each artist succeeds in bringing out the beauty they find in the clay and creating something organically expressive, timeless, and yet totally of the moment.  – Akira Satake, Curator

Curated by renowned ceramist Akira Satake, this exhibition features ceramic ikebana vessels created by some of the most talented potters working within the U.S. today, several of which have lived and studied in pottery towns in Japan such as Bizen, Mashiko, and Shigaraki, where they were all to hone their art and bring back methods of making and firing to the United States. All featured potters, including special guest artist, Japanese Master Potter Ken Matsuzaki, share an innate sense of the importance of ma, or “negative space,” a concept integral to Japanese aesthetics. Exhibition panels will allow visitors to gain insight into the various traditional techniques of ceramics native to Japan, as well as the principles standard to the schools of Ikebana. Artist statements on display will also invite viewers to explore the unique ways each ceramic artist took inspiration from traditional Japanese aesthetics and evolved it to a personal style. Additionally, three Ikebana artists from Ikebana International, Washington D.C., Chapter No.1 will exhibit arrangements inspired by and featuring three of the exhibited vessels.

About the Title: “Floating Islands: Ceramic Ikebana Vessels” – Each ikebana arrangement is an island – a complete and perfect world unto itself that is floating on its ceramic vessel. This idea comes from Ikebana’s objective to distill the outside world, particularly the natural landscape, down to a simple, but perfectly balanced piece of part that can be contemplated indoors. The title is also reminiscent of the “floating world” of ukiyo-e.

This exhibit will move to the District Clay Gallery on September 29th and will be on display at the District Clay Gallery from September 29th to October 31st. 

Exhibiting Artists, Ceramics: Birdie Boone, Erica Iman, Ani Kasten, Sangjoon Park, Jeff Shapiro, Peter Callas, Jan McKeachie-Johnston, Simon Levin, Tim Rowan, Catherine White, Michael Hunt & Naomi Dalglish, Randon Johnston, Ken Matsuzaki, Akira Satake

Exhibiting Artists, Ikebana: Helena Arouca, Ikebana Sangetsu; Bruce Wilson, Saga Goryu Ikebana; Jane Redmon, Sogetsu Ikebana

This exhibition is free and open to the public. The exhibition will run from August 27th through September 27th at the JICC and will be open to the public during regular JICC hours, 9 AM to 5 PM, Monday through Friday. The JICC will be closed on September 3rd in observance of Labor Day. 
Sep
12
Wed
Floating Islands: Ceramic Ikebana Vessels – Exhibition @ Japan Information & Culture Center, Embassy of Japan
Sep 12 @ 9:00 am – 5:00 pm

Explore how a beloved Japanese tradition is being reinterpreted and inherited in the United States at the JICC’s “Floating Islands: Ceramic Ikebana Vessels” exhibition, presented together with the District Clay Center and Ikebana International, Washington, D.C., Chapter No.1, and sponsored by Marymount University.

Each artist succeeds in bringing out the beauty they find in the clay and creating something organically expressive, timeless, and yet totally of the moment.  – Akira Satake, Curator

Curated by renowned ceramist Akira Satake, this exhibition features ceramic ikebana vessels created by some of the most talented potters working within the U.S. today, several of which have lived and studied in pottery towns in Japan such as Bizen, Mashiko, and Shigaraki, where they were all to hone their art and bring back methods of making and firing to the United States. All featured potters, including special guest artist, Japanese Master Potter Ken Matsuzaki, share an innate sense of the importance of ma, or “negative space,” a concept integral to Japanese aesthetics. Exhibition panels will allow visitors to gain insight into the various traditional techniques of ceramics native to Japan, as well as the principles standard to the schools of Ikebana. Artist statements on display will also invite viewers to explore the unique ways each ceramic artist took inspiration from traditional Japanese aesthetics and evolved it to a personal style. Additionally, three Ikebana artists from Ikebana International, Washington D.C., Chapter No.1 will exhibit arrangements inspired by and featuring three of the exhibited vessels.

About the Title: “Floating Islands: Ceramic Ikebana Vessels” – Each ikebana arrangement is an island – a complete and perfect world unto itself that is floating on its ceramic vessel. This idea comes from Ikebana’s objective to distill the outside world, particularly the natural landscape, down to a simple, but perfectly balanced piece of part that can be contemplated indoors. The title is also reminiscent of the “floating world” of ukiyo-e.

This exhibit will move to the District Clay Gallery on September 29th and will be on display at the District Clay Gallery from September 29th to October 31st. 

Exhibiting Artists, Ceramics: Birdie Boone, Erica Iman, Ani Kasten, Sangjoon Park, Jeff Shapiro, Peter Callas, Jan McKeachie-Johnston, Simon Levin, Tim Rowan, Catherine White, Michael Hunt & Naomi Dalglish, Randon Johnston, Ken Matsuzaki, Akira Satake

Exhibiting Artists, Ikebana: Helena Arouca, Ikebana Sangetsu; Bruce Wilson, Saga Goryu Ikebana; Jane Redmon, Sogetsu Ikebana

This exhibition is free and open to the public. The exhibition will run from August 27th through September 27th at the JICC and will be open to the public during regular JICC hours, 9 AM to 5 PM, Monday through Friday. The JICC will be closed on September 3rd in observance of Labor Day. 
Sep
13
Thu
Floating Islands: Ceramic Ikebana Vessels – Exhibition @ Japan Information & Culture Center, Embassy of Japan
Sep 13 @ 9:00 am – 5:00 pm

Explore how a beloved Japanese tradition is being reinterpreted and inherited in the United States at the JICC’s “Floating Islands: Ceramic Ikebana Vessels” exhibition, presented together with the District Clay Center and Ikebana International, Washington, D.C., Chapter No.1, and sponsored by Marymount University.

Each artist succeeds in bringing out the beauty they find in the clay and creating something organically expressive, timeless, and yet totally of the moment.  – Akira Satake, Curator

Curated by renowned ceramist Akira Satake, this exhibition features ceramic ikebana vessels created by some of the most talented potters working within the U.S. today, several of which have lived and studied in pottery towns in Japan such as Bizen, Mashiko, and Shigaraki, where they were all to hone their art and bring back methods of making and firing to the United States. All featured potters, including special guest artist, Japanese Master Potter Ken Matsuzaki, share an innate sense of the importance of ma, or “negative space,” a concept integral to Japanese aesthetics. Exhibition panels will allow visitors to gain insight into the various traditional techniques of ceramics native to Japan, as well as the principles standard to the schools of Ikebana. Artist statements on display will also invite viewers to explore the unique ways each ceramic artist took inspiration from traditional Japanese aesthetics and evolved it to a personal style. Additionally, three Ikebana artists from Ikebana International, Washington D.C., Chapter No.1 will exhibit arrangements inspired by and featuring three of the exhibited vessels.

About the Title: “Floating Islands: Ceramic Ikebana Vessels” – Each ikebana arrangement is an island – a complete and perfect world unto itself that is floating on its ceramic vessel. This idea comes from Ikebana’s objective to distill the outside world, particularly the natural landscape, down to a simple, but perfectly balanced piece of part that can be contemplated indoors. The title is also reminiscent of the “floating world” of ukiyo-e.

This exhibit will move to the District Clay Gallery on September 29th and will be on display at the District Clay Gallery from September 29th to October 31st. 

Exhibiting Artists, Ceramics: Birdie Boone, Erica Iman, Ani Kasten, Sangjoon Park, Jeff Shapiro, Peter Callas, Jan McKeachie-Johnston, Simon Levin, Tim Rowan, Catherine White, Michael Hunt & Naomi Dalglish, Randon Johnston, Ken Matsuzaki, Akira Satake

Exhibiting Artists, Ikebana: Helena Arouca, Ikebana Sangetsu; Bruce Wilson, Saga Goryu Ikebana; Jane Redmon, Sogetsu Ikebana

This exhibition is free and open to the public. The exhibition will run from August 27th through September 27th at the JICC and will be open to the public during regular JICC hours, 9 AM to 5 PM, Monday through Friday. The JICC will be closed on September 3rd in observance of Labor Day.