Cultural Tourism DC Calendar

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Aug
23
Thu
Mata Hari, Agent H21 @ International Spy Museum
Aug 23 @ 6:30 pm

What’s a woman with expensive tastes to do?  World War I Paris offered the legendary Mata Hari some unique opportunities. This 1964 film featuring Jeanne Moreau and Jean-Louis Trintignant  imagines how  the famous dancer used her charm and seductive powers to spy for Germany and bankroll a glamorous life.  But when she falls in love her life as a spy loses its luster. This spy romance includes invisible ink, quick escapes, and a doomed love—perfect film fare for a summer evening. Along with the evening’s screening of Mata Hari, H21, enjoy popcorn and sparkling French soda almost as tasty as Jeanne Moreau’s Mata Hari!

In French with English subtitles; screening at the Spy Museum.

Co-sponsored by the Alliance Française de Washington. For Alliance Members tickets, email soltmans@spymuseum.org
| Tickets include screening, soda, and popcorn.

Aug
25
Sat
Holocaust: The Untold Story @ Documentary Theater (Showtimes are subject to availability)
Aug 25 all-day

Hitler’s systematic extermination of six million Jews was not a secret. Details of the Nazi death camps were known as early as December 1942. Yet the American media — especially The New York Times — refused to publicize the story.
Running time: 55 minutes
Showtimes
Screens at Noon and 4 p.m.

Aug
26
Sun
Holocaust: The Untold Story @ Documentary Theater (Showtimes are subject to availability)
Aug 26 all-day

Hitler’s systematic extermination of six million Jews was not a secret. Details of the Nazi death camps were known as early as December 1942. Yet the American media — especially The New York Times — refused to publicize the story.
Running time: 55 minutes
Showtimes
Screens at Noon and 4 p.m.

Sep
1
Sat
Holocaust: The Untold Story @ Documentary Theater (Showtimes are subject to availability)
Sep 1 all-day

Hitler’s systematic extermination of six million Jews was not a secret. Details of the Nazi death camps were known as early as December 1942. Yet the American media — especially The New York Times — refused to publicize the story.
Running time: 55 minutes
Showtimes
Screens at Noon and 4 p.m.

Sep
2
Sun
Holocaust: The Untold Story @ Documentary Theater (Showtimes are subject to availability)
Sep 2 all-day

Hitler’s systematic extermination of six million Jews was not a secret. Details of the Nazi death camps were known as early as December 1942. Yet the American media — especially The New York Times — refused to publicize the story.
Running time: 55 minutes
Showtimes
Screens at Noon and 4 p.m.

Sep
5
Wed
Japanese Classics: “An Autumn Afternoon”
Sep 5 @ 2:00 pm – 2:00 pm

Watch the trailer.

The last film by Yasujiro Ozu was also his final masterpiece, a gently heartbreaking story about a man’s dignified resignation to life’s shifting currents and society’s modernization. Though the widower Shuhei (frequent Ozu leading man Chishu Ryu) has been living comfortably for years with his grown daughter, a series of events leads him to accept and encourage her marriage and departure from their home. As elegantly composed and achingly tender as any of the Japanese master’s films, An Autumn Afternoon is one of cinema’s fondest farewells. Description by Janus Films. (Dir.: Yasujiro Ozu, Japan, 1962, 113 min., DCP, Japanese with English subtitles)

Sep
8
Sat
Holocaust: The Untold Story @ Documentary Theater (Showtimes are subject to availability)
Sep 8 all-day

Hitler’s systematic extermination of six million Jews was not a secret. Details of the Nazi death camps were known as early as December 1942. Yet the American media — especially The New York Times — refused to publicize the story.
Running time: 55 minutes
Showtimes
Screens at Noon and 4 p.m.

Sep
9
Sun
Holocaust: The Untold Story @ Documentary Theater (Showtimes are subject to availability)
Sep 9 all-day

Hitler’s systematic extermination of six million Jews was not a secret. Details of the Nazi death camps were known as early as December 1942. Yet the American media — especially The New York Times — refused to publicize the story.
Running time: 55 minutes
Showtimes
Screens at Noon and 4 p.m.

Sep
13
Thu
DC Turkish Film Festival: “Sideway”
Sep 13 @ 7:00 pm – 7:00 pm

Watch the trailer.

The residents of a small town set between a stormy sea and an ominous forest are going insane. A black ship anchored far away, a shrill sound, strange cases of arson, missing people, and the sun suddenly turning black lead the townsfolk to believe that the Antichrist is around. A young, modest guy with a mysterious mark on his back arrives in this bizarre place. Could he be Christ arriving to save the town? Sideway is a political allegory of the absurdity in today’s world. Description adapted from the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. (Dir.: Tayfun Pirselimoğlu, Turkey, 2017, 119 min., B&W, DCP, Turkish with English subtitles)

Sep
14
Fri
DC Turkish Film Festival: “Grain”
Sep 14 @ 1:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Watch the trailer.

Climate change has caused the near-extinction of human life in this spellbinding dystopian sci-fi film from Semih Kaplanoğlu (Honey, Milk). People are herded into detention centers, all hoping they can enter a protected city. Outside its walls, a sparse nomadic economy exists. But total disaster is imminent. Genetically engineered seeds, which have all but wiped out real grain, are mysteriously failing to work. While the establishment struggles to find answers, scientist Erol (Jean-Marc Barr) searches for famed geneticist Cemil (Ermin Bravo), who disappeared some years ago after predicting this doomsday scenario. Giles Nuttgens’ (Hell or High Water) stunning widescreen monochrome cinematography plots Erol’s journey, from a city of straight lines to the unpredictable desert wilderness. In Grain, the twin forces of science and mysticism wage war. And with the illusion of its mastery over the planet long since receded, humanity struggles to comprehend what lies in store. Description by the London Film Festival. (Dir.: Semih Kaplanoğlu, Turkey/Germany/France/Sweden/Qatar, 2017, 128 min., DCP, English)

DC Turkish Film Festival: “Big Big World”
Sep 14 @ 4:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Watch the trailer.

Teenagers Ali and Zuhal grew up in an orphanage and share a bond as strong as that between brother and sister. When Ali moves out on account of his age, Zuhal is put into the dubious care of a foster family and kept away from Ali. In a desperate attempt to save Zuhal from an arranged marriage, Ali commits a terrible crime, and they find themselves on the run, away from civilization and into the woods. There, in a secluded space deep in the forest, they try to start a new life in a mystical natural environment full of wonders, strange residents, and concrete threats. Description by Picture Tree International. (Dir.: Reha Erdem, Turkey, 2016, 101 min., DCP, Turkish with English subtitles)

DC Turkish Film Festival: “Butterflies”
Sep 14 @ 7:00 pm – 7:00 pm

Sundance award winner!

Watch the trailer.

Siblings Cemal, Kenan, and Suzi have grown apart since leaving Hasanlar, the tiny village where they grew up, and going their separate ways. When their estranged father demands that they return home immediately, Cemal, the eldest, is tasked with convincing his brother and sister to journey back to places they have been striving to forget. As they try to reunite their dysfunctional family and confront their shared past, the siblings have to contend with each other’s peculiarities—even as the strangest elements of all await them in the village. A wildly inventive and explosive dark comedy that’s as thoughtful as it is surprising, Butterflies defies expectation, balancing playfulness and razor-sharp writing with a heartfelt look at family bonds. Winner of the Grand Jury Prize: Dramatic at the 2018 Sundance Film Festival. Description adapted from the Sundance Film Festival. (Dir.: Tolga Karaçelik, Turkey, 2018, 112 min. DCP, Turkish with English subtitles)

Sep
15
Sat
Holocaust: The Untold Story @ Documentary Theater (Showtimes are subject to availability)
Sep 15 all-day

Hitler’s systematic extermination of six million Jews was not a secret. Details of the Nazi death camps were known as early as December 1942. Yet the American media — especially The New York Times — refused to publicize the story.
Running time: 55 minutes
Showtimes
Screens at Noon and 4 p.m.

Sep
16
Sun
Holocaust: The Untold Story @ Documentary Theater (Showtimes are subject to availability)
Sep 16 all-day

Hitler’s systematic extermination of six million Jews was not a secret. Details of the Nazi death camps were known as early as December 1942. Yet the American media — especially The New York Times — refused to publicize the story.
Running time: 55 minutes
Showtimes
Screens at Noon and 4 p.m.

DC Turkish Film Festival: “The Wild Pear Tree”
Sep 16 @ 1:00 pm – 1:00 pm

US premiere!

In person: Nuri Bilge Ceylan, director

Watch the trailer.

The Freer|Sackler is honored to welcome Nuri Bilge (Once Upon a Time in Anatolia, the Palme d’Or winner Winter Sleep), Turkey’s most accomplished director, to screen and discuss his latest film, which debuted to near-unanimous accolades at this year’s Cannes Film Festival. In it, an aspiring writer returns to his hometown to try to further his career, only to be forced into a reckoning with his father’s shadowy past. Suffused with the philosophical, visual, and narrative richness that characterize Ceylan’s films, The Wild Pear Tree is “a gentle, humane, beautifully made and magnificently acted movie . . . It’s an unhurried, elegiac address to the idea of childhood and your home town, and how returning to both has a bittersweet savour” (Peter Bradshaw, Guardian). (Dir.: Nuri Bilge Ceylan, Turkey/France/Germany/Bulgaria/Macedonia/Bosnia-Herzegovina/Sweden, 2018, 188 min., DCP, Turkish with English subtitles)